Josephine V. Yam

Energy and Climate Change in Obama's To-Do List

In the New York Times article, “A To-Do List for the Next For Years”, Carol Browner proposes the need for President Barack Obama to finally execute on a climate change agenda. Ms. Browner was former director of the White House Office of Energy and Climate Change Policy from 2009 to 2011 and the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 1993 to 2001.

“Energy and climate change, two issues that deeply divide the country, stand out as major pieces of unfinished business for the Obama administration,” she notes. Nevertheless, she points out that President Obama has unequivocally stated that “even for those who don’t believe climate change is real, the benefits of clean energy -- cleaner air, energy independence, American jobs and enhanced global competitiveness -- are just too important to ignore.”

How then can President Obama execute on a climate change agenda? By using his executive authority and by leverage existing energy laws.

The U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed the EPA’s authority to limit greenhouse gases that endanger public health. Browner recalls that during his first term as president, Obama used an energy bill signed by George W. Bush to reach an agreement on cleaner, more fuel-efficient cars. Car manufacturers had business certainty, consumers saved money at the pump and the environment became cleaner. She notes that President Obama can use this existing authority to work with the electric utilities to reduce carbon pollution and secure greater energy efficiency while providing business certainty.

Ms. Browner also recommends that given the abundance of natural gas, the Obama administration must ensure that “fracking” is done in accordance with strong public health standards. Also, instead of 20 to 30 different state regulations that are imposed on fracking businesses, the Obama administration should just develop one set of national requirements based on the best available science and technology while leaving the oversight and enforcement up to the states.

Indeed, by executing on a strong climate change agenda in the next 4 years, President Obama can ensure that the U.S. moves steadily and unconditionally towards a sustainable, clean energy future.