Josephine V. Yam

US is Global Leader in Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions

In his New York Times article, "A Model for Reducing Emissions", Eduardo Porter reports that the US has cut its CO2 emissions by almost 13 percent since 2007. The Americans have reduced their total energy use in the past 5 years by 5 percent. Surprisingly, this reduction is likely the most substantial GHG cut among developed countries and even more than what Europe has achieved.

The most compelling driver for the incredible decline in CO2 spewing is neither regulation nor increased citizenry initiatives to combat climate change. It is simply the interplay of market forces: low energy prices and technological innovation. In other words, the reasons are economic, not political.

Undeniably, the depressed economy has caused the lower production of goods and services, which in turn has decreased the Americans' use of energy. But a breakthrough in hydraulic fracturing of shale rocks has also produced massive amounts of cheap natural gas, which is significantly cleaner than coal. This in turn has caused electric utilities to switch from coal to natural gas, increasing the latter's overall proportion from 21 percent to 30 percent of total electricity produced from power plants.

Will these market forces continue to bring into fulfillment President Obama's goal of cutting CO2 emissions by 17 percent by 2020? Maybe. But until there is a carbon price that internalizes the escalating environmental damage and climate threat that carbon imposes on humanity, only then will there be a genuine driver that effectively dampens massive CO2 spewing.