Josephine V. Yam

By 2023, a Changed World in Energy

“When it comes to energy, the rule of the game is to expect the unexpected,” observed energy historian Daniel Yergin in the New York Times article, “By 2023, a Changed World in Energy”.

Yergin noted: “So much effort is going into research, development and innovation all across the energy spectrum, 10 years from now we may well see the next game changer.”

Writer Clifford Krauss recalls that, in 2003, American natural gas fields were thought to be depleting rapidly such that expensive terminals for natural gas importation, not exportation, were being built. U.S. oil production was likewise declining at rapid rates.

Now, ten years later, the U.S. is well on its way to become energy independent, thanks in no small part to new drilling technology that has made its oil and natural gas fields much more productive. In fact, in its latest World Energy Outlook, the International Energy Agency (IEA) reported that the U.S. will overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world's top oil producer by 2017. This will have massive geopolitical consequences, as the U.S. will no longer depend on undemocratic regimes like Venezuela or Nigeria for obtaining its oil supply.

So what will the energy world look like in 2023? It will be a different energy world where there will be widespread adoption of electric cars, solar panels by business and households and trains and trucks guzzling on natural gas. It will be a world where renewable energy sources will become dominant, accounting "for 32 percent of the overall growth in electricity generation through 2040.”

According to the IEA, the emerging market economies, like China, will still be reliant on fossil fuels through 2035. Yet, it reports that China’s new government has committed to investing more than $70 billion a year in clean energy projects, in recognition of the imperative sustainability path that it must undertake to quench its still growing energy appetite.

“Much of the future of energy will depend on government policy, of course,” noted Krauss. And indeed, a clean energy world will only be possible if governments around the globe arm themselves with the solid political will and foresight to bravely implement policies that support sustainable growth that is so crucial in this carbon-constrained decade.